Story transcripts

Faith, Love and Happiness

Friday, February 18, 2011

Reporter: Karl Stefanovic
Producer: Sandra Cleary

Nicole Kidman has certainly had her highs and lows. Publicly, she's lived the Hollywood dream of fame and fortune.

Privately, she's faced the same struggles of many modern women. The pain of divorce. The heartbreak of miscarriage.

But now at the age of 43, our Nic is positively blooming. A loving marriage and a new family have brought her the happiness that eluded her for so long.

And when Karl Stefanovic caught up with her in Los Angeles, she had the glow of any new Mum - bursting to talk about baby Faith and the birth that caught everybody by surprise.

Full transcript:

STORY:

KARL STEFANOVIC: This is a nice part of LA.

NICOLE KIDMAN: Yeah. Do I like LA? Yeah, I like LA.

KARL STEFANOVIC: Nicole Kidman is a true movie star, with all the style and grace of the Hollywood legends who've gone before her. So where better to meet than Sunset Boulevard, at the grand old Beverly Hills Hotel? I wish there were some photographers around now. This is a very good look for me.

NICOLE KIDMAN: Oh, there's one over there. That's a very famous Beverly Hills pool, where, I think Marilyn Monroe swum there.

KARL STEFANOVIC: Right, well, this is it - you're with a mystery man.

NICOLE KIDMAN: Yeah, yeah.

KARL STEFANOVIC: But all Nicole's fame and acclaim never brought her the happiness she's found at the age of 43, as wife to country music superstar Keith Urban and mum to 2-year-old Sunday Rose and new arrival Faith Margaret - born in December with the help of a surrogate. I just want to, firstly, want to give you a little gift from Australia. Just have a look at that inside there.

NICOLE KIDMAN: Are these for Faith?

KARL STEFANOVIC: How cute are they?

NICOLE KIDMAN: Oh, my God! They're divine. I better get her on a horse. Sunday does not have these. Oh, that's so sweet, thank you.

KARL STEFANOVIC: And we got Sunday something as well.

NICOLE KIDMAN: Her foot is still, you know, to there.

KARL STEFANOVIC: Tiny. Have you got any photos of her?

NICOLE KIDMAN: Yeah, I do. Of course, I have a ton of photos.

KARL STEFANOVIC: Can I have a look?

NICOLE KIDMAN: Yes, I'll give you a look, Karl. There's my little girls. Sweet, isn't it?

KARL STEFANOVIC: So cute. Hang on. Has she got red hair?

NICOLE KIDMAN: She's got red hair, yes.

KARL STEFANOVIC: She's got mum's hair?

NICOLE KIDMAN: Yeah, but Sunday had red hair and then it went blonde. Sunday's very much her dad. And everyone says Faith is more me, but who knows, right?

KARL STEFANOVIC: Nicole's first pregnancy with Sunday Rose was common knowledge. But the announcement of Faith's sudden arrival and the use of what Americans call a gestational carrier caught us all by surprise. Can I ask a personal question - were you at the birth?

NICOLE KIDMAN: Yeah! Oh, yeah!

KARL STEFANOVIC: How was that?

NICOLE KIDMAN: I mean, so deeply, emotionally moving and having given birth and then being on the place of seeing my child being born this way, the love I felt for our surrogate, gestational carrier. When we released our statement I know in Australia there was, like, "Gestational carrier - what does that mean?" And I think we were trying to be accurate. If it's your biological child then you use 'gestational carrier' and if it isn't, then you use 'surrogate'. I mean, who knows what it is, but she was the most wonderful woman to do this for us. And we were in a place of desperately wanting another child and this opportunity arose for us. And I couldn't get pregnant and we wanted another baby. I get emotional just talking about it 'cause I'm so grateful to her. I cannot believe I'm now crying on 60 Minutes.

KARL STEFANOVIC: It's a beautiful thing. You should be proud of it.

NICOLE KIDMAN: Oh, so, so proud and anyone that's been in the place of wanting another child, or wanting a child, knows the disappointment, the pain and the loss that you go through trying and struggling with fertility is such a big thing. And it's not something that I would ever run away from talking about. I've had a very roller-coaster ride with fertility. I just have, and it has never been easy for me so to now be in this place where I have two gorgeous adopted children and two biological children, I can't believe that's what's happened in my life, you know.

KARL STEFANOVIC: Is the bond the same when you gave birth to Sunday as with Faith?

NICOLE KIDMAN: Yes. Yeah. I mean, but it's the same when your children are adopted as well. I think children are children. You'll die for your children and when you feel that as a parent, I mean, that's the unconditional love and people can talk about it and until you feel it, you can't quite grasp it.

KARL STEFANOVIC: Nicole has always yearned to be a mum. As the young wife of Tom Cruise she conceived but suffered an ectopic pregnancy. When she was 25, they adopted daughter Bella and two years later son Connor. Have Bella and Connor met Faith yet?

NICOLE KIDMAN: Yeah. I mean, it's so different because they don't live with us but I would love them to come and live with us at some stage. I mean, they're 18 and 16. It's a different thing. They're teenagers. They're in a whole different place.

KARL STEFANOVIC: Do you think you'll have another baby?

NICOLE KIDMAN: I mean, I never say never. I think if you ask Keith, would we have another baby, he'd be, like, no. I think he's, like, OK. But my sister's got five kids, so I come from the... He's like, "You're not going to be your sister, are you, "where you keep having more and more babies?" But I'm at an age now where it's very hard to have a child, once you hit 43, and we love what we have.

KARL STEFANOVIC: Six years after her divorce from Cruise, Nicole had all but given up on love. Then she met Keith Urban - the wild boy from Caboolture who conquered American country music - and within 18 months they married. Even in the early days, as Keith battled drug and alcohol addiction, their bond never wavered.

NICOLE KIDMAN: We've found each other in this huge world and we're crazy about each other, you know? And we now have this family that's, you know, we've gotten to experience in our 40s, and he's got two little girls, so it's a big life for him now. I'm just so glad to have met my mate, you know? The person that kind of protects me and loves me.

KARL STEFANOVIC: Sounds like a good bloke, that Keith Urban?

NICOLE KIDMAN: He's a good bloke.

KARL STEFANOVIC: I read somewhere that you like his hands.

NICOLE KIDMAN: Well, I mean, guitarists have the best hands. I'm sorry, Karl, but they just do, yeah.

KARL STEFANOVIC: They're alright - a little bit hairy.

NICOLE KIDMAN: No, but actually carpenters have good hands too, and mechanics. I like mechanics' hands.

KARL STEFANOVIC: This is weird! Never heard that before.

NICOLE KIDMAN: Yeah, well, hands say a lot about a man. OK, next question.

KARL STEFANOVIC: Though home is now clearly where her heart is, Nicole still can't resist a challenging role, and her latest film, 'Rabbit Hole', offered one of her toughest. Sunday Rose was just a year old when Nicole played a mother grieving for her child. Was it hard, though, to leave all that at work and come home to Sunday Rose? Is that a difficult thing - to let go of all that emotion?

NICOLE KIDMAN: Oh, it was like... but I was in a place, I mean, I would come back to her and just, you know, lavish her with love because I was so grateful to have her. Do you really think that I don't see her every second of every day?

KARL STEFANOVIC: 'Rabbit Hole' is Nicole's first foray into film producing under her own company. So the accolades being heaped on the small-budget movie mean even more. And you've got an Oscar nomination. That must feel fantastic?

NICOLE KIDMAN: For this film it was probably the sweetest nomination I've ever gotten for anything.

KARL STEFANOVIC: Really?

NICOLE KIDMAN: Yeah. I was in Nashville when we found out and I was jumping around the kitchen with Keith, with Sunday. Faith was not jumping around.

KARL STEFANOVIC: It's the third time Nicole has been nominated for Best Actress and she remains the only Australian woman to have won the top gong. But despite Oscar glory, three Golden Globes and a career spanning 41 films, Nicole maintains her talent is a bit of a mystery even to her. You are our most successful actress.

NICOLE KIDMAN: No. I'm not.

KARL STEFANOVIC: Yes, you are!

NICOLE KIDMAN: I'm so not.

KARL STEFANOVIC: I think you're very modest. You are a great actress.

NICOLE KIDMAN: I think I'm realistic, honestly.

KARL STEFANOVIC: You don't think that you're a great actress?

NICOLE KIDMAN: I don't think I'm a great actress, no. I think I have moments where I can tap into something that's deep. But I don't quite know how and I don't see it as greatness. And I also don't even see it as mine, if that makes any sense.

KARL STEFANOVIC: Well, I think you are.

NICOLE KIDMAN: I see it as... Thanks, Karl. I wouldn't want be anyone else, anywhere.

KARL STEFANOVIC: We've got some vision of you - the first interview you did with 60 Minutes when you were 21.

NICOLE KIDMAN: Oh, no. Really?

KARL STEFANOVIC: It's very cool. It was like, "Wow! This hair!"

NICOLE KIDMAN: Yeah, I now blow-dry my hair and I've actually had the Brazilian Blowout. Have you heard of that, Karl?

KARL STEFANOVIC: Do I need to know about it?

NICOLE KIDMAN: It's not... You mention Brazilian and guys are like, "What?" No, it's the hair blowout thing. So I had that once but my whole life has been trying to get rid of curly hair.

KARL STEFANOVIC: Really?

NICOLE KIDMAN: Yeah, any curly-haired girl will tell you that and now I'm like, "Oh, I wish the curls would come back." But they don't come back in the same ringletty way. So, anyway, hair's a whole other conversation.

KARL STEFANOVIC: I don't mind talking about hair. What would you say to the 21-year-old Nicole today?

NICOLE KIDMAN: Um, I'd say, enjoy it, because that's really the only thing that we have. And choose love. Life's a funny thing, isn't it? I wasn't sure if I'd make it to 43 and I have. So who knows? Maybe I'll make it to 83, maybe I won't. My grandmother made it to 89 and the thing she whispered to me just before she passed away - this is my mum's mum, who I was very close to - she just whispered, "Be happy." Which is a beautiful thing to be given from your grandmother. "Just be happy, Nic."

KARL STEFANOVIC: My grandmother said to me before she passed away, "Your mother thinks you drink too much."

NICOLE KIDMAN: Was she right, Karl?

KARL STEFANOVIC: Maybe, but you're right.

NICOLE KIDMAN: Well, there's things that can help you with that.

KARL STEFANOVIC: But for all her success and her natural beauty, Nicole has suffered criticism for looking too perfect. She admits she tried Botox, but not anymore. People are very cruel in a way, about the way that they, you know, perceive you and look at you and really focus in on your face, which is stupid.

NICOLE KIDMAN: I heard you once defended me on the morning show or something?

KARL STEFANOVIC: Yeah, well, I just think, who cares, you know?

NICOLE KIDMAN: Well, I care about my face, but I don't want... I mean, I think, you know, people are going to do and say things. They have, my whole life.

KARL STEFANOVIC: Is it a constant worry to have to always look fantastic? Is it one of the problems?

NICOLE KIDMAN: I don't feel the need to. I mean, honestly, I have a husband that's pretty easy going in relation to, I think, you know, love, in terms of, the goal is I want you to love my soul. I want you to, because we're going to grow old together and all that's going to go and if that's what captured you or has you interested then we're doomed. So I think a lot of that is, that just melts away and you go into a much deeper place.

KARL STEFANOVIC: And Nicole is in a good place right now. A happy marriage, the mother of four children and that Oscar nomination. Finally, she really does have it all.

NICOLE KIDMAN: I'm just a girl who's been put into pretty extraordinary situations at times and I'm kind of navigating my way through. And I fall over and make mistakes, pick myself back up and hope for the best and try to conduct myself with as much, I suppose, authenticity and, um, you know, a moral code which I feel is right and that's really all I have, so.

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